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terms of budget numbers, how does it compare to the what the u.s. spends on intelligence a couple years ago? >> "the washington post" calculate as best they could. it's difficult because we don't have historical information, either, like we didn't have this in the present day. this makes u.s. spending on intelligence now higher than it was even at the height of the cold war by, you know, $10 billion or so in current. >> really adds up when you put it together. thank you is much, amon.
communications. that came after the german magazine "der spiegel" reported the u.s. national security agency hacked into internal communications at u.n. headquarters in new york. the magazine cited documents obtained from n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. they claimed the n.s.a. also bugged the european union's
arrangements that the nationalso under a court order with major u.s. telecommunications providers. collectively, those providers cover 75% of united states communications. the n.s.a. and the telephone companies have constructed sort of a two-step filtering system that means that the telecommunications companies do the first cut of filtering based on the guidelines that n.s.a. provide under the court order and then they pass a subset of that information to n.s.a., they
throughout the u.s. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the nation's top intelligence official today declassified documents showing that for three years, the national security agency, or n.s.a., collected more than 50,000 emails a year between americans with no connection to terrorism. the foreign intelligence surveillance court in 2011 ruled the collection methods unconstitutional. today's documents show changes the n.s.a made so the program-- designed to target foreign intelligence-- could continue.
player in u.s. intelligence, maybe the national spashl intelligence agency that flies satellites and maybe the nsa was spending money. we know 14.7 billion going to the cia every year.
, for secret u.s. intelligence efforts. "the washington post" reports that, among other things, the national security agency was investigating up to 4,000 reports of possibly security breaches by its own employees, last year. in economic news, the commerce department announced growth last spring was much better than
eventis clearly a of grave concern. when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale and, again, we're still gathering our information about this particular event, but it is very troublesome. >> there's no reason, if there's hide, for the regime not to let the investigative team in. gwen: more tough choices in egypt. >> what we're doing right now is theg a full evaluation of u.s.-egyptian relationship. >> we have the same objective. to see a democratic system in place in egypt. it ahn mccain and i called coup because that's exactly what it is. gwen: and new disclosures about ofernment surveillance american citizens. >> i think that the trust of the american people in their at staket is what's here. gwen: a trio of late summer dilemmas, plus -- 50 year later, we look back at the march may have changed america. gjelten the week, tom of npr, alexis simendinger of real clear politics and michael fletcher of "the washington post." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. our nation's capital, withis "washington week" gwen ifill. corporate fundin
during the dog days of summer as others head to the beach? >> power players, in a huge switch the u.s. is a refiner to the world and a hand full of companies are helping lead the charge. >>> shopping spree, we all like the idea of buying american products but finding them is a different story. so we hit the mall to see for ourselves in our special series made in america. we have all that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for wednesday, august 7th. >>> good evening everyone and welcome. call it the summer stumble. it doesn't qualify as a swoon or full fledged sale off yet but u.s. stocks fell dropping like dominos. japan notably declined 4% as the yen rose against the dollar. here in the u.s. investors seemed unsettled by reoccurring fed chatter thinking the u.s. may scale back stimulus in september maybe not. if not, maybe the end of the year. either way, investors didn't like it. the dow dropped 48 points and the nasdaq to 3654 and the s&p 500 closed at 1690 and change. >>> since 1987, august is the worst month for stocks, so what should investors do? joining us with his
killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america, and around the globe. inflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military -- conflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military intervention in syria. in muted remarks, the president insisted no decision had been made, and any action would be limited and narrow. is america going to attack the assad regime, and when? mark mardell starts our coverage. in a damascus suburb, witnessed second hand by the whole world is a challenge for america and its president, posing a question about the nature of its power. >> it matters because if we choose to live in the world where a thug and murderer like bashar al-assad can gas thousands of his own people with impunity,
and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to help make strategic decisions. we offer tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i am jane o'briant. u.s. western inspectors are met with gunfire as they try to reach the site of a chemical attack. there is tough talk against the assad regime. >> make no mistake. president obama there must be accountability for those who would use the world most heinous weapons against the world's most honorable people. >> the high-profile trial draws to a close in china. now he also awaits the verdict. animals have long world rushes arctic oceans. oil and gas are moving and. tonight we look at the potential impact. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. a moral obscenity is what the u.s. secretary of state is accusing the assad regime of perpetrating against its own. today he ramped up the pressure by saying the syrian gove
. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their it worked hard to understand the industry you are operate in. key provide capital for strategic decisions. we offer tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? and now, "bbc world news america." president obama announced his government surveillance program and assesses this deteriorating relationship with russia. >> we're doing things that are good for the united states and hopefully good for russia as well. but recognizing there are going to be some differences. we will not be able to completely disguise them. >> hiding in plain sight. this sicilian mafia boss was living in italy for decades. italy wants him back to serve his time. it is summer. it must be time for that vacation souvenir. we will trace how the trinkets have become big business. onwelcome to our viewers public television in america and around the globe. today president obama held a wide ranging press conference at the white house on the eve of leaving for his summer vacation. on the agenda was announcing new oversight and transparenc
threaten us, that they are held accountable. >> ifill: and we get his take on race relations in america, following his speech at the lincoln memorial today, 50 years after the march on washington. >> no one can match king's brilliance but the same flame can light the heart of all who are willing to take a first step towards justice. i know that flame remains. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: there was a flurry of activity around the world today on what happens next in syria. at the united nations, britain submitted a resolution to the security council condemning syria for an alleged chemical attack, and author
and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news to -- bbcw >> make sense of world news america. >>. opposition groups claim a massive chemical attack killed hundreds of people including children. mubarak could soon be released in jail and put under house and please do not try this at home. -- two-old are put in nine-year-old are in the record books after walking on the wing of the plane. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. today the opposition in theory claims the government of bashar al-assad killed hundreds of people in a chemical attack. photographs online show multiple casualties, including children. the un security council held an the meeting. a warning this report contains disturbing and upsetting
of backwards. u.s. foreign and defense secretary set down with their russian counterparts, the focus was on finding common ground in strained relationships. >> we are both old hockey players. we both know that diplomacy, like hockey, and sometimes result in the occasional collision. >> the two sites have had their fair share of collisions. recently president obama called off planned talks with vladimir putin. one reason was the russian decision to grant temporary asylum to former cia contractor edward snowden who fled the u.s. after leaking government secrets. despite agreements to reduce nuclear weapons, america's plans for a missile defense shield on russia's doorstep has anchored moscow. the most contentious issue is how to resolve the debt the conflict in syria. russia is a key ally of president assad's regime and the u.s. wants him out. the russians are optimistic, so much so their foreign minister was even taking john kerry's advice. >> how believe they can make a difference in russian-american relations if we act as adults. that is what we're trying to do. >> senior officials
come true? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. the u.s. is ready to launch a military strike against theory at a moments notice. that is what the defense secretary has told bbc news in an exclusive interview. the remarks came after suspected chemical attacks last week, and today, there was fresh fighting on the ground as the french point into the u.s. with some tough words on their own, saying they will punish those who decide to gas people. we start with our reporter who spoke to secretary chuck hagel. >> all dressed up and nowhere to go. were not able to carry out their work due to snipers, but due to which side, it is contested. was pretty clear that the united states has four and an opinion of the suspected chemical weapons attack. >> chemical weapons were used against people in theory it. i think that the intelligence will conclude that it was not the rebels who used it. the deeper we get into this, it seems to me it is clearer and clearer that the government of cereal was responsible. >> and he says he is just waiting for word from
has an obligation to make sure that we maintain the norm against the use of chemical weapons. now i have not made a final decision about various actions that might be taken to help enforce that norm, but as i've already said, i have had my military and our team look at a wide range of options. >> will he or won't he? the white house lays the ground work for a strike on syria, leaving wall street and the world waiting. this is "nightly business report" for friday, august 30th. >>> good evening everyone and welcome. i'm susie gharib. >> and i'm bill griffeth in for tyler tonight. a determined president obama today making the case to justify a u.s. military strike against syria over its use of chemical weapons but no decisions have been made when and how the u.s. will respond, only affirmations no u.s. troops will be sent on the ground. john kerry said administration has evidence the assad regime used chemical weapons that killed more than 1,000 syrians, including hundreds of children. kerry said being war weary does not allow us to turn the other cheek. >> we know after a decade of co
on today's release in the future of egypt, i spoke with the u.s. ambassador to bahrain. there are two schools of thought about what america should do on egypt. one of them is to stand up and back these protests, and the other is to hold our cards close to our chest because we don't know what will happen. >> the united states should exercise strategic patients. people in the united states are troubled by what they see on violence, and by this however, this is a process that will take a long time to play out. we should hold our fire and encourage the egyptian government to work through state institutions and to support those institutions. to not take steps to undermine them and limit the ability to work through these issues. moment,uggest at the the best course is stability even with the control of the military. >> i don't see that as the choice. but the military has a role to play. this is a pillar of the egyptian state. with the judiciary and the legislature. mohamed morsi neutered the judiciary and the legislative, leaving the military. the choice is between the big states and. it is
use poison gas on its citizens and the u.s. will hold the assad regime accountable. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, after facing sniper fire, u.n. inspectors arrived at the site of the alleged chemical weapons attack in syria.. we have the latest on the investigation, and look at options on the table for a u.s. response. >> ifill: a massive wildfire near yosemite national park has engulfed more than 200 square miles, threatening key sources of water and power for the city of san francisco. jeffrey brown gets the latest on the dangerous blaze. >> woodruff: we continue our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by
the u.s. have in the region? >> we violated our own rule of law by not calling it for what it is because our law clearly states that if it's a military coup then aid is cut off. they had the coup and we didn't do that. that's a blow to credibility. amy: the attorney general takes aim at those con victed of minor drug offenses. >> certain low level nonviolent drug offenders who have no ties to large scale organizations, gangs or cartels, will no longer be charged with offenses that impose draconian mandatory minimum sentences. amy: and hillary clinton laying the groundwork for 2016. >> many americans are asking how do we ensure that the law continues to serve and belong to the people in a time when ideology and gridlock have paralyzed our politics? amy: but is this man conceding anything? covering the week, indira lakshmanan on bloomberg news. pete williams of nbc news. and jeff zeleny of abc news. >> award winning reporting and analysis and covering heft as it happens live from our nation's capital this is "washington week." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer producti >> woodruff: edward snowden, the leaker of u.s. surveillance secrets, was granted asylum in russia today. he walked out of the moscow airport where he had been holed up for more than a month. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get reaction from washington and moscow and talk with former national security agency officials about the scope of u.s. spying programs. >> they're still collecting everything, content word for word of every doe midwest incommunication in this country. >> the idea that n.s.a. is keeping files on americans as a general rule just isn't true. >> woodruff: then, rebels fired scores of rockets on the syrian city of homs as the assad regime celebrated army day. margaret warner gets the latest on the bloody civil war from npr's deborah amos. >> brown: law enforcement bids farewell to f.b.i. director robert mueller. ray suarez explores the transformation of the bureau after the 9-11 attacks. >> woodruff: and we hear from two u.s. senators leading the push
acts. >> ifill: tempers often flare as the temperature outside rises. could climate change be making us more violent? ray suarez dives into the details of a new study. >> brown: and a powerful drama based on the true story of one man's last day, before being fatally shot on an oakland subway. we sit down with the director of "fruitvale station". >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama has called off next month's planned meeting with russian president putin. that announcement today underscored the damage done by the dispute over edward snowden. for the record, the statement-- posted on the white house web
>> the u.s. military is ready to go if the president orders a strike on syria. good evening i'm judy woodruff. >> i'm gwen ifill. and the newshour tonight as the obama administration gathers international support for military action, it says the goal of any response will not be regime change. margaret warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided
the debt ceiling and whether the u.s. will be able to pay it's bills come mid october. >>> securing your requirement. whether you're 25, 35, 45 or 55, we'll tell you how much you should be saving now to make sure you do not out live your money. that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for tuesday, august the 27th. >>> good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib here with my colleague bill griffith. investors here in u.s. and around the world dumped stocks worried about the possibility of the u.s. and allies might take military action against syria over it's use of chemical weapons, so investors moved money to safe havens like gold, oil and treasuries. here is a run down of the numbers by the closing bell. the major stock averages fell 1 to 2% and the dow tumbled 170 points and the nasdaq lost almost 80 and the s&p down 26 points. prices on u.s. treasuries rose with the yield on the ten-year to 2.72%. >>> while mean, gold jumped sharply up $27 to $1,420 an ounce. oil also surged. crude gained almost 4% to $109 a barrel, the second biggest gain of the year. >>> well, the rising tensi
who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in syria, syrian regime. timing.ptoe >> i have not made a decision. i have gotten options from our military. gwen: and today, a fierce appeal to the american people. previous storms in history have gathered when unspeakable within our power to stop them, we have been warned temptations of looking the other way. gwen: the crisis over syria boiling point. britain bows out and the u.s. to weigh in.ns >> we have to act. once the red line has been crossed, once chemical weapons have been used, i believe the president has to take action. >> i definitely believe there be a vote. gwen: and syria prepares. >> we are in a state of war now preparing ourselves for the worst scenario. gwen: is the u.s. on the verge of limited but certain war? covering the week, peter baker times," johnork harwood of cnbc and the "new and indira , lakshmanan of bloomberg news. reporting andng itlysis, covering history as happens, live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for provided byweek" is -- >> we we
qaeda attack, the state department today urged all u.s. citizens in yemen to get out of the country "immediately." good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the newshour tonight, the warning came just hours after reports that suspected al qaeda members were killed by an american drone strike in yemen. we get the latest on the terror threat there. >> ifill: then, it's the dawn of a new era at one of america's landmark newspapers. we have an exclusive broadcast interview with the chairman and c.e.o. of the "washington post's" parent company, donald graham. >> warner: "i am the shooter," declared army major nidal hasan at the start of his trial in an attack that killed 13 at fort hood, texas. we look at today's opening arguments and early testimony. >> ifill: the pentagon eased financial pain for its employees by cutting unpaid furlough from 11 days to six. ray suarez discusses the budget cuts and terror threats with deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. >> our effort to deal with the current budget situation, we believe, has to be driven by strategy. th
obama to cancel annual joint u.s. egyptian militarexercises scheduled for next month. mr. obama, however, did not propose spending the $1.5 billion to the egyptian government for rupturing the u.s. egyptian partnership. and they are at an all-time high in egypt. pro democracy forces are still angry at president obama and the former secretary of state hillary clinton for their initial backing for the former president. mubarak. this is followed by mr. obama's swift and embrace, whom the pro democracy forces blame, for trying to hijack their democratic resolution and to turn it into an islamic republic. and the sentiment was worse for the u.s. ambassador that is now being withdrawn, denouncing the tactics of the forces. and the supporters for their part, they blame the u.s. for secretly blasting them the ongoing support for the government. and the danger now is that the u.s., they have limited leverage at the time of the rising tensions. tensions that could lead to the prolong strikes between the muslim brotherhood and the egyptian government. >> and question on friday, the official death t
for a report from inspectors, but the u.s. says action cannot be held up by intransigence. as the world waits to see what the u.s. and its allies will do, syrian neighbors are preparing for repercussions. >> in syria it self the u.n. weapons inspectors have been taking their first look at one of the areas where chemical weapons were supposedly used. senior british officials are .ure americans it is hard to think britain will not be involved, but the british government is desperate to avoid huge mistakes when a rack was invaded 10 years ago. was invaded 10 years ago. i do not know, but president administration are not known to be trigger-happy. what they will decide, i do not know. u.s. -- at the you in, it does sound like a rerun of .he iraq crisis >> they are part of the problem. they are not part of the resolution. arming andhind supplying groups with logistical support as well as with weapons. >> britain put forward a draft resolution today to the other representatives on the security council, and russia and china seem strongly against it, but it looks as though that may not prevent the th
griffeth in for tyler tonight here with susie gharib. waiting for confirmation the u.s. and its allies are nearing a decision on staging a military strike against syria. that fear sent the markets into a tail spin on tuesday. today a different story, though, stocks ended higher, that after traders heard no further rattling about syria and after a surge in oil prices that actually helped lift energy stocks today. the dow ended higher of three straight losing sessions finished up 48 points, the nasdaq up 14, the s&p added 4. crude oil up another dollar a barrel. it's first settle above $110 a barrel since may of 2011 and that helped the entire energy sector and sent shares of dow components exxonmobil up more than 2%. >>> even though oil prices spiked higher, prices here at home at the pump are holding. that could change. hampton pearson explains. >> reporter: as millions of americans get ready to hit the road for the long holiday labor day weekend gasoline prices at $. $3.55 a gallon are up. possible military strikes against syria could be a game changer with some predicting a 10 cents
enforcement reason. >> woodruff: today, in san francisco, the u.s. attorney general said that number must come down. eric holder addressed the american bar association's annual meeting. >> although incarceration has a significant role to play in our justice system-- widespread incarceration at the federal, state, and local levels is both ineffective and unsustainable. it imposes a significant economic burden-- totaling $80 billion in 2010 alone-- and it comes with human and moral costs that are impossible to calculate. as a nation, we are coldly efficient in our incarceration efforts. with an outsized, unnecessarily large prison population, we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, deter, and rehabilitate, not merely to warehouse and forget. >> woodruff: one step toward a solution, according to holder: scale back mandatory minimum sentences for low-level, non- violent drug offenses. there are almost 220,000 prisoners in federal penitentiaries, now: 40% over capacity. nearly half those inmates are serving time for drug-related crimes. holder plans to tell federal prosecutors to ch
it was responsible. a shocking escalation of the use of weapons in syria. we hope people responsible will one day be held accountable. i hope they blow have unrestricted access to the area and the united nations will be racing this at the un security council. >> the army and armed forces would like to say these allegations are false and baseless and such claims within the context of the dirty media war. go ahead with confronting terrorism. >> we sought advice from an expert. >> there appears to be a lot of dead people with no outward wounds that have died of something. some of the symptoms like the debt stairs are very similar to what we saw where thousands of people were killed by nerve .gents >> chemical weapons inspectors are in serious, but they do not have government permission to visit the site and may not get it. it is unclear those responsible will ever face justice. >> what is the reaction out of the west? we will go to nick bryant. hearing?you any consensus? >> no consensus. the allegations of this atrocity, and they pointed to the statement of the foreign ministry in moscow. that blame
. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? "abc world news america." america."rld news reporting from washington, i'm laura trevelyan. violence returns to the streets of egypt. at least 50 people are killed as the muslim brotherhood's day of anger results in fierce battles with security forces. >> the last couple of minutes, there was fire into the wall just above where we were. several hundred people in the crowd have retreated. all this is a sign of the danger on the streets of cairo. >> thousands gathered to remember the 34 miners killed in south africa last year. mine officials say they are truly sorry. taking us in through music history. we will introduce you to our bones you have probably never heard of before, and maybe for good reason. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. it was legit again today on the
weren't doing anything at all, we had our hands up in the air, like this. why are they killing us? >> brown: an egyptian internet t.v. service showed police apparently firing live rounds directly into the crowds. but state t.v. broadcast this infrared footage and said it showed the pro-morsi crowds firing at police. some residents said the protesters shot first. >> ( translated ): they are firing on people, with guns and automatic weapons. the army and police are over there. do you hear that? people can't even stand or see what's happening and they're firing heavy weapons on us. >> brown: at least two journalists were among those killed: a cameraman for britain's "sky news" and a reporter for "the gulf news,"- based in the united arab emirates. a spokesman for egypt's military-backed interim government blamed morsi's muslim brotherhood for the bloodshed, and insisted police did their best to avoid any killing. >> ( translated ): the government demands the political leadership of the brotherhood stop incitements to violence, which threaten national security; the government holds th
from cairo and debate options for the u.s. >> woodruff: then, the u.s. defense department rolled out its plan to curb sexual assaults in the military. we dig into the details and discuss whether more needs to be done. >> brown: the maker of the painkiller oxycontin refuses to disclose a full list of doctors who may over-prescribe the addictive drug. we have the latest on an investigation by the los angeles times and new pressure from lawmakers. >> woodruff: the nation of myanmar is home to one of the world's most persecuted minorities-- the rohinga. we have the harrowing tale of what happens when this group of muslims try to flee to safety. >> it looks like a cross between a teddy bear and a house cat. >> brown: and say hello to the olinguito-- the newly-discovered mammal species. we talk to the scientist who helped find the furry creature. >> a detective's trail from skins and skulls in a museum all the way down to a cloud forest in the western slopes in the andes in ecuador, first realizing the animal was a new species and then seeing the new species in the wild. >> woodruff: that'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 209 (some duplicates have been removed)